Wednesday, June 28, 2017

FAMU receives $550K grant from Intel to promote diversity in technology

Florida A&M University (FAMU) announced yesterday that it is receiving a grant from Intel Corporation to expand pathways for more women and underrepresented minorities to enter and succeed in tech fields.

The partnership is a part of the Intel Historically Black College and University (HBCU) Grant Program, which was developed to increase the number of African Americans who pursue degrees in electrical engineering, computer engineering and computer science. FAMU will be awarded $550,000 over a three-year period to offer two-year scholarships. Up to 26 junior to doctorate level students majoring in these areas will reap the benefits.

In addition, the partnership will help to support student tutoring and mentoring programs, labs, research experiences and workshops that will encourage collaboration between academia and the technology industry to equip students with the relevant skills needed to succeed in the technology sector.

The partnership will also encourage professional development, including consideration for an internship or full-time job at Intel upon graduation.

“We are thrilled to partner with Intel to expand scholarship opportunities for our computer science and engineering students,” said George Cotton, FAMU’s vice president for University Advancement. “This FAMU grant will not only help our talented students to excel academically without the burden of debt but also paves the way for the University to produce more women and underrepresented minorities working in STEM.”

Intel developed the concept for the HBCU Grant Program in 2015 after the corporation set a bold goal of reaching full representation of women and underrepresented minorities in the U.S. workforce by 2020. As a result, Intel committed $300 million to support diversity in technology initiatives, investing in education pathway programs, university partnerships, diverse entrepreneurs, anti-online harassment initiatives and spending with diverse suppliers.

Nearly $5 million was earmarked to encourage students to remain in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) pathways at HBCUs. FAMU was among only six universities to be selected for the program.

“As we work to build a more diverse, inclusive workplace, it’s vital that we continue developing pathways for exceptional, diverse STEM talent – not only to encourage them to pursue STEM, but to ensure they’re supported with the best possible resources,” said Barbara Whye, chief diversity and inclusion officer and vice president of Human Resources at Intel Corporation. “Our work with HBCUs will give students the tools they need to excel in STEM careers, and we hope they will bring their great minds to Intel.”

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