Showing posts with label Engineering. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Engineering. Show all posts

Saturday, August 12, 2017

NSF awards $2.5M for FAMU, Purdue partnership on food, energy, and water

FAMU Farm at Research and Extension Center in Quincy, Fla.
The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded $2.5M to Purdue University for a partnership research and training program with Florida A&M University.

According to the project abstract: “This National Science Foundation Research Traineeship (NRT) award to Purdue University and Florida A&M University will form an interdisciplinary traineeship program that will train graduate students in the skills needed to produce sustainable supplies of food, energy and water (FEW) for a more heavily populated earth. The project anticipates training 48 PhD students, including 24 funded trainees, from agronomy, agricultural and biological engineering, electrical and computer engineering, chemical engineering, materials science and engineering, chemistry, and agricultural economics.”

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Jax Federal Credit Union awards scholarship to FAMU biomedical engineering student

Jax Federal Credit Union recently presented Ryan Wallace with a $1,000 scholarship. Wallace, a 2017 graduate of Jean Ribault Senior High School, is a rising freshman at Florida A&M University who plans to study biomedical engineering.

The credit union received more than 30 applications for this year’s scholarship contest. Applicants had to submit an entry form, essay questions and transcripts. Wallace was chosen for his participation in financial education programs, athletic leadership skills and his understanding of how investing in his education will benefit his future.

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Prestigious DoD SMART Fellowship awarded to FAMU grad student

FAMU graduate student Faheem Muhammed has been awarded the 2017 Department of Defense SMART (Science, Mathematics and Research for Transformation) Fellowship, one of only two hundred nationwide across all fields and the first FAMU student to have received this prestigious award. The is the first DoD SMART Fellowship to be awarded in the Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, FAMU-FSU College of Engineering.

Muhammed's graduate research will involve working with Professor Subramanian Ramakrishnan in the FAMU-FSU Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering and with U.S. Army Research Laboratory scientist Larry Holmes, Principal Investigator for Additive Manufacturing Materials Development. The topic of this group's research involves additive manufacturing of low k dielectric polymer-particle composites for electromagnetic shielding applications.

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

FAMU receives $550K grant from Intel to promote diversity in technology

Florida A&M University (FAMU) announced yesterday that it is receiving a grant from Intel Corporation to expand pathways for more women and underrepresented minorities to enter and succeed in tech fields.

The partnership is a part of the Intel Historically Black College and University (HBCU) Grant Program, which was developed to increase the number of African Americans who pursue degrees in electrical engineering, computer engineering and computer science. FAMU will be awarded $550,000 over a three-year period to offer two-year scholarships. Up to 26 junior to doctorate level students majoring in these areas will reap the benefits.

In addition, the partnership will help to support student tutoring and mentoring programs, labs, research experiences and workshops that will encourage collaboration between academia and the technology industry to equip students with the relevant skills needed to succeed in the technology sector.

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

“FAMU advocates” are reliable in fighting for the school, Powell isn’t

In an op-ed posted on the Tallahassee Democrat website yesterday, state Sen. Bobby Powell called himself “an advocate” for Florida A&M University. Part of his statement compared his feelings about FAMU, where he earned his bachelor’s degree, to FSU, where he earned his master’s degree.

“With the increasingly negative news that continues to come out of FAMU, it is becoming more and more difficult to be an advocate,” Powell wrote. “On the bright side, I also received a degree from Florida State University.”

Powell’s view of his FSU degree as being the “bright side” over his affiliation with FAMU could help explain a lot. That might be a reason why he hasn’t publicly voiced concern that FSU alumni hold most of the appointed seats on their alma mater’s Board of Trustees (BOT) while there are only two alumni in appointed seats on the FAMU BOT.

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Three female FAMU doctoral graduates break barriers in engineering

According to the National Science Foundation (NSF), minority women comprise fewer than 1 in 10 scientists and engineers in the United States. Studies from researchers around the world reveal that one anecdote to this disparity is to ensure there are more role models in underrepresented communities.

Three Florida A&M University (FAMU) female doctoral students, who are also best friends, recently received their doctorates in engineering. They endured setbacks, including the loss of a classmate and overcame financial hurdles to ensure that they join the next generation of engineering leaders who will help close that gap.

On April 29, Miami native and Fulbright Scholar Renee Gordon received her doctorate of philosophy in mechanical engineering; Miami Beach native and Winifred Burks-Houck Professional Leadership awardee Shannon Anderson received her doctorate of philosophy in civil engineering, with a concentration in environmental engineering; and Birmingham, Alabama native and NSF International Research Experiences grantee Marcella Carnes received her doctorate of philosophy in civil engineering with a concentration in structures.

Thursday, May 04, 2017

Suspicious COL, COE dean changes hurt Mangum’s credibility with many faculty, alumni

At this time last year, the FAMU campus was buzzing with word that then-President Elmira Mangum might be preparing to show four deans the door for reasons that had nothing to do with the university’s best interests.

The names circulating as the possible “targeted” deans were School of Architecture and Engineering Technology Dean Rodner B. Wright, School of Business and Industry Dean Shawnta Friday-Stroud, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Dean Michael D. Thompson, and School of Journalism and Graphic Communication Dean Ann L. Wead Kimbrough.

There were legitimate reasons to believe that some dean changes were needed. But the bigger question was whether the Mangum administration could be trusted to treat deans fairly.

Thursday, March 23, 2017

NCA&T controls millions at its COE, FAMU lost control of $12.9M at FAMU-FSU COE

NCA&T Chancellor Harold Martin listens as then-FAMU President Elmira Mangum speaks in 2015
North Carolina A&T University is not only the largest single campus historically black college or university (HBCU) in the nation, but its College of Engineering remains the #1 producer of engineering degrees on the undergraduate level awarded to African Americans.

The NCA&T College of Engineering continues to benefit from Chancellor Harold Martin’s decision to make it a central part of his vision for strengthening the university’s presence in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) education. Martin’s work to build his alma mater’s engineering programs goes back to his years of service as chairman of the Department of Electrical Engineering and later dean of the college.

One big advantage that NCA&T’s engineering college currently has over Florida A&M University’s is that NCA&T controls millions of recurring dollars in legislative appropriations for its program. A study from 2011 estimated that the recurring appropriation for the NCA&T College of Engineering was about $5M per year.

Thursday, February 23, 2017

Rose a real Rattler who spoke out against FAMU losing budget control at FAMU-FSU engineering

Back when Anika Noni Rose was a theatre student at Florida A&M University, Frederick S. Humphries was her president. She watched while he battled to make sure that the university kept control of the multi-million dollar budget for the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering (COE).

Humphries struck a deal with Florida State University President Bernie Sliger in 1987 that gave FAMU control of the budget in exchange for an agreement to support Innovation Park as the building site for the COE. The deal was made final by the 1987 “Memorandum of Agreement.”

But FAMU’s control of that budget came to an end in 2015.

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

FSU got secret $2M on behalf of FAMU-FSU COE, Mangum’s name wasn’t on request form

A report by the Naples Daily News shows that FSU President John Thrasher got his university a secret $2M appropriation on behalf of the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering (COE). But then-FAMU President Elmira Mangum’s name wasn’t on the request form he submitted to the Florida Legislature.

“The College of Engineering shared by FSU and Florida A&M University also received $2 million in a one-time secret appropriation that lists Thrasher as the requester on a form also dated Dec. 4, 2015, with [FSU lobbyist Kathleen Daly] identified as the contact, records show. FAMU President Elmira Mangum’s name was not included on the form,” the newspaper reported.

The December 4, 2015 request by Thrasher came less than five months after FAMU lost budget authority for the COE. July 1, 2015 was the date that the Chief Financial Officer of Florida began sending the multi-million dollar appropriated budget for the engineering college to FSU instead of FAMU. FAMU had previously gotten the funds in its general revenue line for 28 years.

Thursday, February 16, 2017

FAMU receives $958,673 HBCU-RISE award

L-R: Professors Carl Moore, Hui Wang, and Tarek Dickens
FAMU-FSU College of Engineering professors, Tarik Dickens and Hui Wang, with the Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, and Carl Moore, with the Department of Mechanical Engineering, have been awarded a National Science Foundation (NSF) Historically Black Colleges and Universities Research Infrastructure for Science and Engineering (HBCU-RISE) award to develop research in advanced manufacturing utilizing biomimetic robotics.

HBCU-RISE activity within the major Centers of Research Excellence in Science and Technology (CREST) program supports the development of research capabilities at HBCUs that offer doctoral degrees in science and engineering. This competitive national grant, worth over $958,673 is the first one awarded to FAMU, and one of only two ever awarded in the entire state of Florida.

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

2015: Thrasher praises Mangum’s support of changes that lead FAMU to lose budget control at COE

Back at a Florida Board of Governors (BOG) meeting on February 19, 2015, FSU President John Thrasher praised then-FAMU President Elmira Mangum for supporting a plan with changes that helped him put an end to 28 years of FAMU budget control at the joint College of Engineering (COE).

He made the comments as Mangum sat in the chair next to him.

Thrasher told the BOG: “The thing that I think President Mangum and I have both agreed on and certainly with your staff is this, this, these changes, these changes that we’re talking about, the organizational changes, the transparency, the accountability, which are all in here, which you all, every one of you I know believe in, frankly go back to making this a successful program for the students.”

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

2014: Robinson takes Thrasher to task for suggesting he agreed to split COE, calls claim “comical”

Back in 2014, state Sen. John Thrasher, R-St. Augustine, suggested that former FAMU Interim President Larry Robinson had supported the idea of splitting the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering (COE) while he was in office.

But Robinson publicly took him to task for mischaracterizing his position.

“That is totally incorrect,” Robinson said in response to Thrasher’s claim in a Miami Herald blog story by reporter Tia Mitchell.

Monday, January 02, 2017

Brown proudly touted support for Mangum during scandal-plagued, losing reelection bid

Back when Elmira Mangum was struggling to save her presidency between late 2015 and fall 2016, the FAMU alumni state lawmakers who had once been her among her most vocal supporters stopped publicly defending her.

The only FAMU graduate in a high-profile elected office who was willing to proudly stand by Mangum was U.S. Rep. Corrine Brown.

Brown actually seemed to think that her support of Mangum would help her during her scandal-plagued reelection bid in the Fifth Congressional District of Florida. The incumbent representative faced an uphill battle for the Democratic nomination after Alfred “Al” Lawson, a FAMU alumnus, challenged her in the newly redrawn district.  

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

FAMU scholar returns to “The Hill”

Each year hundreds of alumni arrive on the campus of Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (FAMU) for the annual Homecoming celebration bringing with them advice and wisdom to pass down to a new generation of Rattlers.

Two weeks ago, one alumnus decided to stop by a little early to share his story as a featured speaker in the Scholars’ Speak Series hosted by the Division of Student Affairs’ Scholarships Programs office.

William Robinson, a 1996 graduate of the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering and former Life Gets Better and National Achievement Scholar, addressed a crowd of current scholarship recipients with whom he shared the story of his journey to FAMU and his life after leaving the “Hill.”

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

FAMU president has final say on faculty appointments, not deans

Last month’s Rattler Nation editorial that mentioned how John Thrasher used former FAMU President Elmira Mangum to help him put an end to 28 years of FAMU budget control at FAMU-FSU College of Engineering (COE) got the usual misinformed responses on social media from Rattlers-in-name-only who still don’t have a clue.

FAMU went from having control over the then-$10.4M COE budget in 2015 to now just being the tenure home of the COE dean.

One of the nonsense claims that’s still being spread is that FAMU is really better off now because previous COE deans declined to fill vacant FAMU faculty positions and moving the dean’s tenure home to FAMU was necessary to fix that problem.

Thursday, September 22, 2016

Lee built social media following among gullible, Rattlers-in-name-only

John Michael Lee is one of the biggest defenders of Elmira Mangum, the FAMU president who John Thrasher used to help him put an end to 28 years of FAMU budget control at FAMU-FSU College of Engineering (COE). But now Lee is asking to be taken seriously in his claim that the powers-that-be are “using” the current FAMU administration.

The saddest thing is that Lee has a small, but loud social media following of gullible Rattlers-in-name-only who believe him.

On Monday, FAMU Interim President Larry Robinson terminated Lee’s contract as a special assistant in the Office of the President. Lee responded by putting his termination letter on display in an unofficial FAMU Alumni Facebook page and then posting rants with conspiracy theories about recent events at the university. 

Wednesday, September 07, 2016

David supported Joint Council in ending FAMU budget control at engineering college

FAMU Board of Trustees (BOT) Chairman Kelvin Lawson has said that Provost Marcella David could be named as an acting replacement for President Elmira Mangum next week. But David has been at the center of many of the biggest problems that led the BOT to deny Mangum a contract extension.

Last year, David helped Mangum and Florida State University President John Thrasher put an end to the 28 years of FAMU budget control of the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering (COE).

Back in 2015, with Mangum and David’s support, the legislature moved the $12.9M for the COE from the FAMU line to a new budget entity called “FAMU/FSU College of Engineering.” 

Following the transfer, a new Joint College of Engineering Governance Council decided that it was going to start calling the shots on the COE operating budget. This has made it possible for the FSU representatives and BOG Chancellor Marshall Criser, III to now out vote FAMU on budget decisions.

Sunday, August 28, 2016

Magnum, Thrasher have become quite a team


FAMU President Elmira Mangum helped FSU President John Thrasher put an end to the 28 years of FAMU budget control of the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering (COE) in 2015. She did that despite the existing legislative budget language that favored FAMU and the Florida Board of Governors (BOG) study that said nothing about shifting the money from the university. 

Last year, with Mangum's approval, the legislature moved the $12.9M for the COE from the FAMU line to a new budget entity called “FAMU/FSU College of Engineering.”  

Following the transfer, a new Joint College of Engineering Governance Council was created and it started calling the shots on the operating budget. This has made it possible for the FSU representatives and BOG Chancellor Marshall Criser, III to now out vote FAMU on budget decisions.

Friday, July 29, 2016

Budget control decides how much money goes to diversity efforts at FAMU-FSU engineering

New FAMU-FSU College of Engineering (COE) Dean J. Murray Gibson is continuing to say the right things about bringing more diversity to the school.

WCTV-6 reported yesterday that Gibson “plans to invest time in recruiting and retaining FAMU students. Right now, the school has roughly 2,200 students, but only about three to four hundred are FAMU students. There are about 100 staff members, yet only about a third are FAMU faculty members.”

Those things are all good. But the choice of how much money will actually be designated for diversity efforts at the COE is out of his hands.