Showing posts with label Enrollment. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Enrollment. Show all posts

Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Saunders-White used “enhanced recruitment efforts” to reverse NCCU’s enrollment decline

North Carolina Central University (NCCU) Chancellor Debra Saunders-White used aggressive recruitment and new partnerships for dual degrees to help reverse the two year enrollment decline at her school.

NCCU had two straight years of falling enrollment caused by the federal financial aid program overhaul in 2011. Enrollment went from 8,604 in Fall 2012 to 8,093 in Fall 2013. It then went down again in Fall 2014 to 7,687.

The decline in Fall 2014 cost the university millions of dollars in tuition and fees.

“Revenues from tuition and fees decreased by $2.1 million due to the five-percent decrease in full-time equivalent students,” according to the Management’s Discussion & Analysis section of the university’s 2014-2015 state financial audit.

Tuesday, August 09, 2016

Mangum’s alma mater NCCU reverses enrollment decline with freshmen GPAs at 3.21

FAMU President Elmira Mangum speaking at NCCU's commencement on May 13, 2016
At the North Carolina Central University (NCCU) Graduate and Professional Commencement back on May 13, FAMU President Elmira Mangum talked about how much she learned in the school’s classrooms while she was a student there. Today, there’s quite a bit NCCU could teach her about effective enrollment management.

NCCU had two straight years of falling enrollment caused by the federal financial aid program overhaul in 2011. Enrollment went from 8,604 in Fall 2012 to 8,093 in Fall 2013. It then went down again in Fall 2014 to 7,687.

But NCCU Chancellor Debra Saunders-White, who started on June 1, 2013, has reversed the enrollment drop and brought in a strong class of freshman students. The NCCU freshmen in Fall 2015 had an average GPA of 3.21 and overall enrollment went up to 8,011.

Monday, August 08, 2016

Martin achieving better enrollment results than Mangum while being paid $65,000 less

North Carolina A&T University Chancellor Harold Martin, who leads the largest single campus historically black college or university (HBCU) in the nation, earns $360,000 per year.

He is continuing to grow enrollment at his alma mater with strong classes of freshmen students. The NCA&T Institutional Research freshman profile data shows that the freshman classes in Fall 2014 and Fall 2015 both had an average high school GPA of 3.28.

The NCA&T freshman class in Fall 2014 also had an average ACT score of 18.71. That was higher than the national average for black students, which was 17.1.

Friday, August 05, 2016

A&T enrollment grew with freshman ACT scores above national average for black students

Back in Fall 2014, Florida A&M and North Carolina A&T both enrolled freshman classes that had ACT scores that were above the national average for black students.

The national average ACT score for African American high school students in 2014 was 17.1. The FAMU freshman class in Fall 2014 had an average of 21. The NCA&T freshman class had an average of 18.71.

For all the students in 2014, the national average was 21.

The FAMU freshman class had a 3.34 average GPA in Fall 2014 and the freshmen at NCA&T had a 3.28 average GPA.

Thursday, August 04, 2016

BOT was told performance funds would cover student losses, but Mangum now calling for $10.5M cut

Back at a FAMU Board of Trustees (BOT) committee meeting on June 9, Chairman Kelvin Lawson said the BOT had been told that performance funds would be used to cover the projected $10M loss in tuition and fees due to an expected decline in enrollment for 2016-2017.

“$10M of the $11M [in performance funding] was applied to what we called an enrollment gap,” Lawson said.

On June 22, the Florida Board of Governors officially announced that FAMU would receive $11,509,132 in performance funds. But now FAMU President Elmira Mangum has told her staff to prepare for a $10.5M cut due to the enrollment decline.

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Martin expanding NCA&T’s enrollment with freshman classes that have 3.0+ average GPAs

NCA&T Chancellor Harold Martin shakes hands with U.S. Rep. Gwen Graham in 2015
North Carolina A&T University (NCA&T) Chancellor Harold Martin hasn’t placed quality aside as he has expanded enrollment. He reversed the school’s decline in students in Fall 2014 after two straight years of falling enrollment caused by the federal financial aid program overhaul. The freshman, first-time student classes that Martin enrolled in Fall 2014 and Fall 2015 both had 3.0+ average GPAs in high school.

The NCA&T Institutional Research freshman profile data shows that the freshman classes in Fall 2014 and Fall 2015 both had an average high school GPA of 3.28.

The freshman, first-time student classes at FAMU had slightly higher average GPAs at 3.34 in Fall 2014 and 3.40 in Fall 2015. That’s a difference of 0.06 and a 0.12 with NCA&T for those two years.

But the biggest difference is in the effect on the financial condition of the two universities.

Monday, July 18, 2016

1997: Humphries enrolls nearly 11,000 students, freshmen SAT scores above national average

General Motors ad that ran between 1989 and 1990
Back in Fall 1997, Florida A&M University had 10,998 students. That’s more than any historically black college or university (HBCU) today. North Carolina A&T University (NCA&T) was the largest single campus HBCU in Fall 2015 with 10,852 students.

NCA&T Chancellor Harold Martin boosted his school’s enrollment in Fall 2015 and expects more enrollment growth in Fall 2016.

FAMU’s enrollment in Fall 2015 dropped to 9,920 (down from 10,233 in Fall 2014) under President Elmira Mangum. That cost FAMU $9M+ from tuition and fee losses. FAMU expects to lose about another $10M due to its projected loss of 920 students in 2016-2017.

Thursday, July 14, 2016

Kimbrough says all HBCUs should be able to increase their enrollments in 2016-2017

Some defenders of the current Florida A&M administration aren’t bothered by the continuing enrollment decline because they don’t think the university is up-to-the-task of reversing it through the recruitment of high-achieving students. But the best historically black college and university (HBCU) presidents don’t accept that way of thinking at the schools they lead.

Dillard University President Walter Kimbrough said that even though HBCUs were hurt by the overhaul of the federal financial aid program in 2011, they all should be able to increase their enrollments in 2016-2017. He said one reason for this is that HBCUs have received increased interest from black students who are having second thoughts about predominantly white colleges in light of the racial incidents on some of those campuses.

Dillard is projecting that its enrollment will increase by 115 students in Fall 2016. FAMU projects a loss of 920 students in 2016-2017.

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

Enrollment up at SU Baton Rouge, Grambling State, SU Shreveport, and SU New Orleans

Graduates of the Southern University School of Nursing in Spring 2015
The current administration of Florida A&M University remains full of lame excuses for the continuing enrollment decline.

Elmira Mangum began her contract at FAMU on April 1, 2014. The university’s enrollment in Fall 2015 dropped to 9,920 (down from 10,233 in Fall 2014). That cost FAMU $9M+ from tuition and fee losses. FAMU expects to lose about $10M more due to its projected loss of 920 students in 2016-2017.

The enrollment at many historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) across the nation went down after the overhaul of the federal financial aid program in 2011. But a number of HBCUs are already recovering from the damage.

Enrollment is up at most of the public HBCUs in Louisiana.

Thursday, July 07, 2016

Enrollment management effectiveness a big difference between NCA&T, FAMU's top leaders

Harold Martin’s success in building North Carolina A&T into the largest single campus historically black college or university (HBCU) in the nation shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone. He is one the best experienced enrollment managers among all of today’s HBCU leaders and came to his alma mater with a big vision for the future.

Martin held a number of administrative roles at NCA&T early in his career that helped him learn how to be effective in recruiting students and meeting enrollment goals. According to his official biography, his “earlier positions at NC A&T [included] vice chancellor of academic affairs (1994–99); dean of the college of engineering (1989–1994); chair and acting chair of electrical engineering (1985–87 and 1984–85, respectively) and acting chair (1984-85) of electrical engineering.”

He later served as senior vice president for academic affairs at the University of North Carolina, General Administration and chancellor of Winston-Salem State University. WSSU had the fastest rate of enrollment growth in the entire UNC while he was its top administrator.

Wednesday, July 06, 2016

Delaware State’s enrollment reaches all-time high, continuing to grow

Yesterday, the Tallahassee Democrat reported that former Florida A&M President James H. Ammons decided to remain on the university faculty rather than take the provost’s job at Delaware State University (DSU).

It isn’t hard to see why Ammons was interested in working for DSU President Harry Williams. Williams is using creative approaches to help the school grow.

The recruitment program Williams implemented has led to five consecutive years of enrollment increases. FAMU’s enrollment has gone down every year since Fall 2011. FAMU officials have announced that the university expects to lose about $10M more because of the enrollment drop that is projected for 2016-2017.

A Newsworks article recently discussed Williams’ recruitment success. An excerpt is below:

Tuesday, July 05, 2016

Virginia State reverses its enrollment decline, projects 5% increase for Fall 2016

Florida A&M University was one of the many historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) hit hard by the overhaul of the federal financial aid program in 2011. The university has lost $27.4M in tuition and fees due to declining enrollment since 2012-2013. FAMU expects to lose about $10M more because of the enrollment drop that is projected for 2016-2017.

But some HBCUs have already started recovering from the damage that the 2011 federal financial aid shakeup caused.

Former FAMU Dean Makola M. Abdullah became the 14th president of Virginia State University (VSU) on February 1, 2016. He came to a school where the fall semester enrollment had been going down for years.

An article in Washington Post on December 31, 2015 reported that for Fall 2015: “At Virginia State, there were 4,696 students in the fall, down from 5,025.” That was a decline of 7 percent. The Associated Press said that the VSU enrollment decline caused “a loss of between $2.1 million and $3.4 million.”

Thursday, June 30, 2016

NCA&T gained $4M boost in tuition and fees during 2014-2015 as FAMU took $9.2M loss

The Rattler football team took a 40-21 loss as the Aggies' homecoming opponent in 2014
North Carolina A&T University took FAMU’s former title as the #1 largest single campus historically black college or university in 2014-2015. It also gained a multi-million dollar boost in its tuition and fee revenue due, in part, to its enrollment increase that year.

“Tuition  and  fees  increased  by  $4,002,160.32  or  7.63%,  due  to  increases  in  fee  rates  as  well  as  enrollment increases,  particularly  in  out-of-state  students,” the Management's Discussion & Analysis section of the 2015 financial audit for NCA&T stated.

NCA&T enrolled 10,725 students in Fall 2014. A total of 2,230 of them, or 20 percent, were from out-of-state. The six-year graduation rate at NCA&T (for the class that began Fall 2008) was 49 percent.

Monday, June 27, 2016

2014: Mangum says she’s not convinced hazing incident led to FAMU enrollment decline

The enrollment drop at FAMU didn’t start with President Elmira Mangum. But the financial losses from the continued decline in students have gotten worse since she’s been in office.

FAMU lost a total of $9.2M in tuition and fees because of declining enrollment in 2012-2013 and 2013-2014.The university then took a hit of $9.2M due to the enrollment decline in 2014-2015.

FAMU lost another $9M because of the enrollment drop in 2015-2016, after Mangum had over a year to lead recruitment efforts. FAMU expects to lose more than $9M in 2016-2017 due to its projected loss of 920 students.

Some Mangum supporters are trying to blame the enrollment decline on the negative news from the 2011 hazing death of Marching 100 drum major Robert Champion. They appear to want people to forget how Mangum herself responded to that assumption in 2014.

Thursday, June 23, 2016

Student losses take most of FAMU's $11.5M performance funds, FSU's $35M being invested

Not having to scramble to find money for a multi-million dollar enrollment nosedive really makes a difference.

Yesterday, the Florida Board of Governors (BOG) announced performance funding amounts for the State University System of Florida.

Florida State University received $35,574,608 in performance funds. According to the Tallahassee Democrat, “FSU said the money will be used to hire top professors in the STEM fields, along with student support services. It also will be invested in the university’s Center for Academic Retention and Enhancement program, which supports first-generation college students.”

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

$10M expected loss from enrollment drop depletes 90% of FAMU’s performance funds

Performance funding in the State University System of Florida (SUS) is supposed to give schools an extra boost. But most of the performance funds that FAMU expects to receive will be used to plug the budget hole created by the projected drop in enrollment for 2016-2017.

FAMU expects to lose 920 students in 2016-2017, which will lead to budget cuts.

“The FY 16-17 budget has been prepared with an anticipated 920-student decline in enrollment,” the FAMU Division of Finance and Administration said in a budget workbook for the Board of Trustees (BOT). “The decrease in enrollment is expected to be off-set by reallocation of vacant positions, performance base funding, and budget adjustments to all divisions’ operating budgets.”

Thursday, June 09, 2016

FAMU lost $9M+ due to enrollment drop in 15-16, expects to lose 920 students in 16-17

The Florida auditor general reported that FAMU lost $9.2M in tuition and fees due its enrollment drop in 2014-2015. Today, the FAMU Division of Finance and Administration told the Board of Trustees (BOT) that the university lost more than $9M after the enrollment decline this year.

“The increase or decline in enrollment not only results changes to the tuition and fees revenues but also to revenues from sales and services,” the division said in the BOT budget workbook.  “The significant enrollment decline which occurred in the current fiscal year resulted in a decline in tuition and fees revenues in excess of $9 million.”

FAMU had 10,738 students in Fall 2013. That went down to 10,233 students in Fall 2014 for a loss of 505. FAMU lost another 313 students in Fall 2015 for a total of 9,920.

The university expects to lose 920 students in 2016-2017, which will lead to more budget cuts.

Wednesday, June 01, 2016

State audit: FAMU lost $9.2M in tuition and fees in 2014-2015, mainly due to enrollment drop

FAMU is paying big for the continuing decline in enrollment.

The "Management's Discussion and Analysis" section of the 2014-2015 financial statement audit for FAMU said the enrollment drop caused FAMU to lose millions in tuition and fees in 2014-2015.

“Net student tuition and fees decreased by $9.2 million, or 17.1 percent, as compared to the 2013-2014 fiscal year,” the section said. “This decrease was due primarily to a decline in enrollment.”

FAMU had 10,738 students in Fall 2013. That went down to 10,233 students in Fall 2014 for a loss of 505.

Tuesday, April 12, 2016

NCA&T determined to keep FAMU’s former title as nation’s largest single campus HBCU

North Carolina A&T took Florida A&M’s former title as the single largest historically black college or university (HBCU) in the nation back in 2014 and is determined to keep it.

Harold Martin, the chancellor of A&T, bragged about his university being No. 1 in HBCU enrollment while he sat beside FAMU President Elmira Mangum during a July 15, 2015 appearance before the Committee on Agriculture in the U.S. House of Representatives.

“With nearly 11,000 students, A&T is recognized as the largest among the nation’s historically black colleges and universities,” Martin told the committee.  

A&T topped FAMU in enrollment again during the Fall 2015. It had 10,852 students to the 9,920 at FAMU for a difference of 932.