Showing posts with label Faculty. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Faculty. Show all posts

Friday, November 13, 2015

FAMU, FSU launch Technology Commercialization Accelerator Program

By Mike Devine
FAMU-FSU College of Engineering

A joint effort by Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, Florida State University, and other community partners has resulted in a new program designed to accelerate the commercialization of university research.

Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Concerns rise over language used to discourage tough questions at FAMU

Kimberly Moore and Elizabeth Davenport both gave Elmira Mangum their support when she became the 11th president of Florida A&M University last year. Moore is a member of the FAMU Board of Trustees (BOT) and she voted to hire Mangum in January of 2014. Davenport, a professor of educational leadership at FAMU, appeared before the BOT and spoke in favor appointing Mangum.

But in recent months, Moore and Davenport have both felt the need to raise concerns about the direction the school is heading under the current administration.

Moore served as the chairwoman of the BOT presidential evaluation committee this year. She gave Mangum a “Did Not Meet Expectations” rating for five of the ten questions in her evaluation.

Monday, November 09, 2015

Mangum generous with administrative bonuses, but not faculty pay

Ever since her appointment in 2014, FAMU President Elmira Mangum has been very generous in providing “signing bonuses” to a select group of administrative hires.

Records obtained by WFSU show that Mangum paid $60,000 in such “signing bonuses” to five administrators:
  • Brittanian Gamble, director of academic excellence ($5,000)
  • Dale Cassidy, chief financial officer ($15,000)
  • Marcella David, provost and vice-president for academic affairs ($15,000)
  • John Michael Lee, assistant vice-president for alumni affairs ($5,000)
  • Milton Overton, athletics director ($25,000)

Monday, November 02, 2015

FAMU study looks to empower citizens in addressing food deserts

By Ivette Lopez, Ph.D. in Partnership with Sustainable Tallahassee

If you happen to stop by the corner of Macomb and Georgia streets on a Saturday, you will see a bustling gathering of community entrepreneurs trading everything from fresh greens to organic homemade soaps and candles. Farmers’ markets, like the one in Tallahassee’s historic Frenchtown, connect people with fresh, locally grown food and each other.

In “food deserts,” like parts of Tallahassee, where places to purchase nutritious produce are scant and nearby food stores instead emphasize packaged or fast foods, a farmers’ market would seem to present the perfect solution to improve nutrition for local residents while also supporting small to medium-sized local farmers.

Saturday, October 31, 2015

David Jackson appointed FAMU associate provost and dean of Graduate Studies

Longtime and nationally recognized Florida A&M University Professor David H. Jackson has catapulted his passion for encouraging students to pursue graduate degrees into a new role as associate provost for Graduate Education and dean of Graduate Studies.

In his new role, Jackson is responsible for providing leadership and coordinating programs and services to promote the academic success for all graduate students.

Jackson received his bachelor of science in history and master’s degree in public administration from FAMU. He went on to obtain his doctoral degree from the University of Memphis.

He joined the FAMU faculty in the fall of 1997. He was promoted to the rank of associate professor in three years and full professor of history in the College of Social Sciences, Arts, and Humanities in only seven years.

Monday, October 12, 2015

FAMU faculty member receives prestigious Triumph Award

Marjorie McNeill, director of Health Informatics and Information Management in the School of Allied Health Sciences at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, is a recent recipient of a national award.

McNeill, who has served at FAMU for more than 30 years as an instructor and clinical coordinator, received the “Triumph Educator Award” during the 2015 American Health information Management Association’s (AHIMA) 87th Annual Convention and Exhibit in New Orleans. The awards recognize the excellence, dedication and service of health information management professionals who have made steadfast efforts to enrich the field.

Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Sybil Collins Mobley, 1925 - 2015

Sybil Collins Mobley, the founding dean of the FAMU School of Business and Industry (SBI), died this morning at the age of 89.

Mobley was born in Shreveport, Louisiana on October 14, 1925. She earned a bachelor of arts degree from Bishop College in 1945, a master in business administration degree from the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania in 1961, and a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois in 1963.

Over the span of her 58 years of service to FAMU, she served as a professor (1963-2003), department head (1971-1974), and the founding dean of SBI (1974-2003), and then dean emeritus.

Monday, September 21, 2015

FAMU journalism professor takes Mangum to task for “bullying” student newspaper

On Friday, a member of the FAMU School of Journalism and Graphic Communication faculty took President Elmira Mangum to task for “bullying” the campus student newspaper.

Valerie D. White, an associate professor of journalism, wrote a stinging opinion column in response to Mangum’s “Open Letter to the Editor of The Famuan” that was posted on the University's revamped news blog on September 10. Mangum wrote the open letter after The FAMUan Editor-in-Chief Reggie Mizell wrote a September 3 opinion column that criticized her for excluding student editors from the planning process for a new “official newspaper” at the university. The editor-in-chief of Journey Magazine, TyLisa Johnson, was a contributor to the opinion piece.

Sunday, August 02, 2015

FAMU pharmacy professor selected for prestigious NIMHD Translational Health Disparities Course

R. Renee Reams, professor of biochemistry and chair of the medicinal chemistry section in the FAMU College of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences (CoPPS) has been selected as a participant scholar in the two-week intensive 2015 National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) Translational Health Disparities course, titled “Integrating Principles of Science, Practice, and Policy in Health Disparities Research.” The course will take place August 3-14 on the campus of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Md.

Saturday, August 01, 2015

FAMU and UFF reach tentative agreement on collective bargaining

The administration of FAMU reached a tentative agreement yesterday on the Collective Bargaining Agreement with the United Faculty of Florida (UFF).

The FAMU and UFF agreement provides for a 1.5 percent across the board wage increase to the base salary, retroactive to August 1, 2014.

The agreement also provides for a $250 one-time bonus payment to all members employed on August 1, 2014, and a 1 percent, one-time bonus payment to all UFF bargaining members who have been continuously employed at FAMU for 10 years, obtained the rank of full professor, and are employed as of the date of ratification. The wage increases will take place within 60 days after full ratification.

Friday, July 31, 2015

Boston appointed new associate provost for faculty affairs and development

On July 8, FAMU Professor Genyne Henry Boston became the university’s new associate provost for faculty affairs and faculty development.

In the newly created position, Boston will provide leadership in ensuring academic and research excellence, as well as innovation in facilitating a learning environment of intellectual vibrancy, personal and social responsibility, success, and significance for both faculty and students.

“I believe that everyone has a role to play in the success of our students,” Boston said. “It is my goal to ensure that faculty members are equipped with information and resources to make a difference in the learning experience of FAMU students.”

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Tensions rise over Mangum’s treatment of FAMU faculty

Back in 2014, several of the semi-finalists for the FAMU presidency had records that showed they had very little respect for college faculty. Elmira Mangum was not one of them and that helped her get the job.

But now, a growing number of the FAMU faculty members who gave their support to the vote to appoint Mangum that year are expressing disappointment about the way she is treating FAMU professors.

Faculty Senate President and Board of Trustees member Bettye A. Grable gave Mangum a “Does Not Meet Expectations” rating for eight of the ten questions in her presidential evaluation. Some of her biggest criticisms were about a lack of shared governance by the administration.

Tuesday, June 30, 2015

No public explanation for how shifting engineering budget from FAMU to FSU will help resolve faculty salary disparities

Early into her FAMU presidency, Elmira Mangum presented the university Board of Trustees with a budget workbook that described the problem of faculty salary disparities in the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering (COE). That document dated April 29, 2014 said that “over the years, salary increases at FSU and no corresponding increases at FAMU have contributed to the disparity.”

This problem is part of the reason why FAMU has a much smaller number of engineering professors at the college than FSU does. The workbook explained that: “When [FAMU’s] most outstanding faculty receive better offers, FSU often is unwilling to let the College lose them. For FSU faculty, FSU provides counter offers and for FAMU faculty FSU provides new faculty lines with competitive salaries to retain them. While the net effect benefits the College, from [the] FAMU perspective however, it shifts the distribution of faculty between FAMU and FSU, especially the most productive.”

The $10.9M COE appropriation that FAMU received from the legislature for 2014-2015 paid for facility operations and the salaries of 23 FAMU professors and 27 FSU professors. FSU received a separate appropriation of $5M in its general revenue (E&G) budget that paid for another 36 FSU professors.

Monday, April 27, 2015

Charles Ullman Smith (1926-2015) remembered for activism and university service

On Saturday, members of the FAMU family paid their final respects to Charles Ullman (C.U.) Smith, a longtime member of the university faculty. The funeral service took place at Bethel Missionary Baptist Church with burial at Culley's Meadowwood & Memorial Park.

Smith died on April 20, 2015. He was 91 years old.

“C.U. Smith lived a wonderful life and made a great contribution to Florida A&M,” former FAMU President Frederick Humphries told the Tallahassee Democrat. “His contributions were not only superb in academe, but he helped us frame a great perspective on how we should live together.”

Wednesday, December 03, 2014

FAMU, UF partner to create Florida Minority Cancer Research and Training Center

FAMU Professor Renee Reams, principal investigator
By Lindy Brounley
UF Health Cancer Center

For many underrepresented minorities, pursuing careers in cancer research can be daunting. Nontraditional academic backgrounds and lack of exposure to research experiences often are impediments to underrepresented minorities’ preparedness for successful cancer research careers.

These minority students and investigators will now have support from the Florida Minority Cancer Research and Training Center, the state’s first and only National Cancer Institute minority institution/cancer center partnership focused on cancer research and training for African-Americans.

Funded by a $1.3-million award from the NCI — augmented with $320,000 in funding from the University of Florida Health Cancer Center — the center is administered by scientists from UF and Florida A&M University to provide research mentoring and training opportunities that burnish minority students’ and junior faculty members’ research skills, better preparing them for biomedical careers that could impact cancer health disparities in Florida’s minority communities.

Saturday, November 29, 2014

FAMU mechanical engineering professor awarded Carnegie African Diaspora Fellowship

By Jan Aussiker
FAMU-FSU College of Engineering

Peter Kalu, 3M Distinguished Research Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, was recently awarded a fellowship from the Carnegie African Diaspora Fellowship Program.

The Carnegie African Diaspora Fellowship Program is a scholar fellowship program for educational projects at higher education institutions in Africa. The program participants are African-born academics that currently live in the United States or Canada and work in higher education. Kalu's fellowship will include research collaboration on the following topics:

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Pulitzer Prize winning journalist joins FAMU’s faculty as new Knight Chair

The FAMU School of Journalism & Graphic Communication (SJGC) recently welcomed Francine Huff as the Knight Chair for Student Achievement.

While at the Wall Street Journal, Huff served as the Spot News Bureau Chief and contributed to the Journal’s Pulitzer Prize winning team coverage of the September 11, 2001 events.

This endowed chair is a five-year appointment. The goal of the Knight Foundation is to preserve the best aspects of journalism and use innovation to expand the impact of information in the digital age. It focuses on funding journalistic excellence and supports transformational ideas that promote quality journalism and advance media innovation, as well as engage communities, and foster the arts.

Monday, October 06, 2014

FAMU psychologist returns from Ferguson, Mo. after offering trauma support to community

FAMU psychology professor Jackie Collins Robinson recently traveled to Ferguson, Mo. to volunteer to assist local children and community members in dealing with the aftermath and subsequent trauma surrounding the shooting death of Michael Brown.

Robinson, who is a licensed psychologist and licensed school psychologist in Florida, spent four days in Ferguson. Her visit was inspired by an invitation from the president of the St. Louis Chapter of the Association of Black Psychologists to help the organization meet the emotional needs of impacted adults and children in the Ferguson area through conducting wellness workshops.

“The St. Louis Chapter is one organization responding to the people of Ferguson’s demand for trauma related interventions,” Robinson said. “I was happy to lend my skills to this effort.”

Sunday, September 28, 2014

FAMU theatre icon Ronald O. Davies has died

Dr. Ronald O. Davis, professor emeritus and former director of the Essential Theatre at Florida A&M University, has died.  Davis, was found dead at his home in Asheville, North Carolina, over the weekend.  He was 80 years old. 

Davis who began his tenure at FAMU in 1969.  He retired in 2001, but continued to play a "supporting role" in the FAMU theater department's growth and development . Earlier this year, he staged a Jazz fundraiser for the department with the goal of raising $100,000 for student scholarships.

The cause of death or funeral arrangements are not yet known.  

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Temple U. Professor headed for FAMU

Iyelli Ichile, chair, of Temple University's undergraduate program in African American Studies has resigned her position for a new job at FAMU, according to the Philadelphia Inquirer. Ichile's resignation Monday came suddenly with classes at Temple set to begin on August 25. 

In an email to Temple students and faculty,Tuesday, African American Studies Department Chairman Molefi Asante described Ichile as "one of our most active and valued faculty members."

"Of course, we were stunned and broken hearted; however, we must wish her well and regroup and move forward with the work to be done for the next year."
The Inquirer reports, both Ichile and her fiance both found jobs at Florida A&M University "and will be moving immediately."
Temple student leader Paul Cange, said students were shocked to learn Ichile is leaving.
"She was so important in the department, and she was well-liked," Cange said.
He said he had registered for his first class with her for the upcoming semester.
As undergraduate chairwoman, Ichile helped students who majored and minored in African-American studies stay on track with their classes.