Showing posts with label Graduate School. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Graduate School. Show all posts

Friday, April 21, 2017

Appreciation Week focuses on FAMU graduate programs

By Katherine L. Brinkley-Broomfield
Florida A&M University

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University’s (FAMU) School of Graduate Studies and Research sponsored Graduate Student Appreciation Week, March 13-17.

Terrance McNeil, academic program specialist and coordinator of the Graduate Feeder Scholars Program, served as the primary facilitator of the week’s activities.

“We have graduate student appreciation week because it’s our way of acknowledging the outstanding contributions and academic achievements of our students. We’re very proud of them, Florida A&M University’s graduate programs are by far some of the strongest among all HBCUs,” McNeil said.

Sunday, September 25, 2016

White House names FAMU doctoral candidate 2016 HBCU All-Star

The White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (WHIHBCU) has recently named Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (FAMU) doctoral candidate Terrance McNeil as one of its 73 2016-HBCU (historically black college or university) All-Stars.

McNeil, a fourth-year doctoral candidate studying educational leadership, was selected from more than 300 students from 24 states. FAMU has consistently been represented on the list of ambassadors who are tasked with providing outreach opportunities and communicating with other students about the value of both education and the Initiative as a networking source.

Saturday, October 31, 2015

David Jackson appointed FAMU associate provost and dean of Graduate Studies

Longtime and nationally recognized Florida A&M University Professor David H. Jackson has catapulted his passion for encouraging students to pursue graduate degrees into a new role as associate provost for Graduate Education and dean of Graduate Studies.

In his new role, Jackson is responsible for providing leadership and coordinating programs and services to promote the academic success for all graduate students.

Jackson received his bachelor of science in history and master’s degree in public administration from FAMU. He went on to obtain his doctoral degree from the University of Memphis.

He joined the FAMU faculty in the fall of 1997. He was promoted to the rank of associate professor in three years and full professor of history in the College of Social Sciences, Arts, and Humanities in only seven years.

Wednesday, November 04, 2009

FAMU creates feeder program to grow graduate enrollment

The FAMU School of Graduate Studies and Research recently launched one of its most ambitious initiatives since the hugely successful Graduate Feeder Scholars Program. This time FAMU is working to feed graduates of other HBCUs into FAMU's graduate programs.

"It is common for HBCU’s to partner with other institutions for the purposes of helping minority students attain advanced degrees," said Chanta Haywood, dean of FAMU’s School of Graduate Studies and Research. What distinguishes this program from other partnerships is that this consortium consists solely of HBCUs.

FAMU will serve as the lead institution in the new HBCU Graduate Research and Education Program (HGREP). Its role will be to deliver graduate education to recent alumni of other HBCUs. In the long run, this should help FAMU boost its graduate enrollment and boosts its classification from a Carnegie Doctoral Research University to a Research-Intensive University.

Haywood noted that “research shows that minorities who receive their undergraduate degrees from an HBCU are more likely to pursue their graduate degrees at an HBCU as well.” That is precisely why Haywood chose to target the more than 350,000 students at historically black colleges and universities.

“Our best and brightest need not go to majority schools when we have outstanding graduate education right here,” Dean Haywood said. “Dr. [James H.] Ammons has stated that we (HBCUs) must take the lead now to train the students who will not only populate our own graduate programs as students, but who will also remain at our institutions and serve as professors and administrators. This is why we are calling the students James H. Ammons Fellows, because they embody this vision.”

The first recipient of the James H. Ammons Graduate Fellowship is Joane Theodule, a 22 year-old from Pine Hills, Fla., who received her bachelor’s degree in political science with a minor in public administration from Bethune-Cookman University. Theodule, a native of Haiti, will receive an impressive scholarship offer, which includes the following:

The full cost of tuition and fees for two years;
• A working graduate research assistantship for up to $9,000 per year for two years;
• The full cost of health insurance while they are a research assistant;
• A stipend (where available) to assist with travel to present a paper at a professional conference;
• A stipend (where available) to assist with the cost of research material to carry out your studies; and
• Funds to travel back to their undergraduate institutions as a F.A.C.E.S. Students (FAMU Ambassadors for Continuing Educational Success) to recruit other dynamic scholars.

When asked about her initial reaction to the news that she was selected as an Ammons Fellow, Theodule stated she was in awe.

“I was totally shocked, amazed, overwhelmed and full of joy,” said Theodule. “I am truly blessed.”

Theodule is pursuing her master’s degree in applied social sciences with a concentration in public administration. Her future aspirations are to finish graduate school and start law school in August 2010 at FAMU’s College of Law.