Wednesday, July 08, 2020

FAMU Law to continue online instruction for Fall semester

FAMU College of Law Dean Deidré Keller announced earlier this week that all classes will continue to be taught online during the Fall 2020 semester.  The  decision was made in accordance with the recommendation of the College of Law Reopening Task Force. 
“While we recognize that this is a shift in direction, we have made this decision because we believe it is in the best interest of our students, faculty and staff,” said Keller, who began her tenure as dean and professor of law on July 1. 
The Task Force considered a number of issues regarding the COVID-19 pandemic, including current outbreak numbers, the influx of students moving to Central Florida, health risks, student concerns, class sizes, classroom sizes, and the actions of public schools, universities and colleges.  
FAMU Law shifted to online instruction on March 23, as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Fall classes begin Monday, August 10 and the law school had planned to deliver courses using a hybrid model, with some classes taught in the classroom under strict sanitation requirements, and others taught online.  
“We’ve concluded that given the current trends, there is a significant possibility of circumstances evolving such that online instruction becomes necessary at some point during the semester,” Keller added.

Tuesday, July 07, 2020

Saundra Inge retired FAMU administrator dies at age 75

Saundra R. Inge (center) surrounded by FAMU President Larry Robinson and First-Lady Mrs. Sharon Robinson.
Saundra Roland Inge, a retired FAMU administrator whose genuine love, care and support of students made her one of the university’s most beloved administrators, died on Sunday, July 5, of complications related to cancer. She was 75.
Mrs. Inge retired from FAMU in 2010, at the age of 64 —after 35 years of service to the university. In her later years at FAMU, Inge served as Director of Student Activities, but many Rattlers remember her as the long-time director of Student Financial Aid.
“I just love being around young folks.  I think that’s what it is most of all. I never grew up really,” Inge told the FAMUAN, in a story on her impending retirement.
Quintin Haynes, now an Adjunct Associate Professor at New York University,  as a 21 year-old student, said about Inge “what I will miss most about her is her thought process and her willingness to get things done and make it happen. I don’t think student activities be the same.”
Tera Waldo, who at the time had been Inge’s student assistant for four years, said “I’ve learned so much from her. She’s helped me develop into the young lady that I am. I love her and I’m so thankful to have her as a boss and as a friend.”
Inge was not only one of the most admired and respected FAMU administrators, during her time on “the Hill”, she was “student centered” long before “student centered” became a thing.   
“Mrs. Inge was one who loved FAMU, all of its students and especially Beta Alpha  where she served as the AKA Grad Advisor for 20 years, wrote AndraLica McCorvey-Reddick, in a Facebook tribute.

“(She was) one of the sweetest, kindest people that I have ever known. Twenty years after I left FAMU she was still taking care of students when my nephew arrived on the Hill in 2009. When he became a BN Alpha in 2010, he called her Soror Inge. She was like another Grandmother to him. She had him running errands for her when she was Director of Student Activities.  She will be missed by FAMU and AKA,” McCorvey-Reddick added.

Inge was preceded in death by her husband Dr. Leonard L. Inge, a retired FAMU Pharmacy professor, who passed away in 2019.

Monday, July 06, 2020

Angelia Williams named Executive Director of the Rattler Boosters

Angelia Williams
Angelia Williams has been named Executive Director of the Rattler Boosters, she will replace Tommy Mitchell.

Williams, a native of Dallas, Texas, most recently served as the Special Projects & Corporate Sponsorships Coordinator with the FAMU Athletics Department, and previously worked at the FAMU Foundation, taking over at the Rattler Boosters.  She also serves as Recording Secretary of the FAMU National Alumni Association.
 
"We are excited to Welcome Angie as the Executive Director of the Rattler Boosters," FAMU AD Kortne Gosha said. "We firmly believe that her wealth of experience at the university and in the community will enhance coordination with the National Alumni Association, Boosters, and the external efforts of the department of athletics. In consultation with Booster President Selvin Cobb, we feel that Angie will elevate the Boosters to new levels."
 
In her role, Williams will assist the Director of Athletics in any day-to-day activities. In addition, she will continue to build relationships with corporate sponsorships and work as a liaison with the Rattler Boosters.
 
FAMU Athletics also announced the hiring of Chandler DeRieux, who was an intern at the University of Alabama Birmingham, but has a passion for intercollegiate athletics, as athletics compliance coordinator.  He holds both bachelors and masters degrees in Sports Management.


FAMU is currently on NCAA probation and was cited for a lack of "institutional control" after, among other things, it was determined that 93 student athletes were improperly certified.

Saturday, July 04, 2020

Friday, July 03, 2020

FAMU wraps up virtual Summer Band Camp with over 700 students

The FAMU summer band camp would not let a nationwide pandemic stop it, instead of the usual in person camp, quickly shifted to a virtual format for 2020 and had its third highest attendance in 27 years with more than 700 students and more than 100 band directors from around the world.

The virtual camp completed three full days of instruction yesterday, was free for students this year because of the coronavirus.  While the camp was free it adopted a "pay what you will/can" for to still raise funds. 
The camp had various sessions for elementary, middle, and high school students to improve their music and dance skills.
Dr. Shelby Chipman, the director of marching and pep bands, says because of the pandemic this is the first time in 27 years the camp has not met face to face.
“Just to see their faces and their spaces whether they were in their living room whether they were in their bedrooms some of their parents when we did the early morning exercises and like fitness participated for those 20 minutes and talked to them about health and wellness prior to all of this start of the session it was just…we just never thought it would come together like this,” said Dr. Chipman.

As an educator these times can be very scary as we navigate how best to continue to render meaningful instruction. They did not miss a beat with this experience. The Directors Symposium covered so many valuable topics,” Tryphena Hughes, Band Director, Akili Academy in New Orleans, wrote on Facebook.  “This experience did not miss a beat.  I can’t wait to bring more of my students back to campus for the full in person camp next year.”

Thursday, July 02, 2020

Gov. DeSantis vetoes funding for two FAMU programs

When Governor Ron DeSantis signed Florida’s 2020-21 state budget on Monday, he vetoed a record $1 billion in state projects, including two at FAMU.

The 18-page veto list included $200,000 in operational funding meant to help jumpstart the FAMU Brooksville Agricultural Environmental Research Station (BAERS0, a 3,812 acre farm located in Brooksville, FL, just outside Tampa.  FAMU had been seeking state support of the farm since gaining control of the property in 2015. 

The site includes 19 buildings, 2,830 sq feet of laboratory space, and 3,60 sq ft of office space. When FAMU gained control of the property it was considered the largest single land transfer ever from the federal government to a HBCU.

DeSantis, also vetoed $200,000 to create an immersive Mandarin Chinese language program at FAMU.  The program was designed to expose FAMU students to one of the most widely spoken languages in the world.When Governor Ron DeSantis signed Florida’s 2020-21 state budget on Monday, he vetoed a record $1 billion in state projects, including two at FAMU.

The 18-page veto list included $200,000 in operational funding meant to help jumpstart the FAMU Brooksville Agricultural Environmental Research Station (BAERS0, a 3,812 acre farm located in Brooksville, FL, just outside Tampa.  FAMU had been seeking state support of the farm since gaining control of the property in 2015. 

The site includes 19 buildings, 2,830 sq feet of laboratory space, and 3,60 sq ft of office space. When FAMU gained control of the property it was considered the largest single land transfer ever from the federal government to a HBCU.

DeSantis, also vetoed $200,000 to create an immersive Mandarin Chinese language program at FAMU.  The program was designed to expose FAMU students to one of the most widely spoken languages in the world. Mandarin is considered an important language in the business world and increases students opportunities for employment.

The Governor was forced to make deep cuts to the 2020-21 state budget to cover more than $2 billion lost state revenue from the coronavirus pandemic. 

Wednesday, July 01, 2020

U.S. Surgeon general: If you want college football this year, wear a mask

As coronavirus cases continue to surge across the country, Surgeon General Jerome Adams had a piece of advice for college football fans while talking to reporters on Tuesday.
If you want college football this year, wear a mask. 
Public health expert after public health expert has stressed the importance of face coverings to prevent further coronavirus cases and the subsequent deaths and economic harm they bring. And yet, the idea of losing college football might be what’s needed to put the situation in perspective for some.
College football, perhaps more than any other sport, needs a downturn in coronavirus cases. Rosters are larger compared to pro leagues, which increases the number of ways the virus can reach locker rooms. Seasons also can’t be played in a secluded area like the NBA is attempting to do. And while college-age athletes might face fewer health risks if they contract the virus, there is still a risk to both the players and the people around them.

As several professional sports leagues creep back to action, which may not even be an advisable decision, the fate of the college football season continues to be unclear. NCAA president Mark Emmert has said he does not see college sports happening if a school doesn’t have its students on campus, which could lead to massive inconsistencies.
Some schools, that have brought their athletes back on campus, are seeing a dramatic amount of cases on their football teams. Clemson alone has 37 cases as of its latest update, while Texas Tech has 23. Other schools, like Arizona, have halted the return of athletes to campus.
And even if schools are able to get everyone back on the field for the fall, just one outbreak would wreak havoc with a team’s season, as well as every team on its schedule.
Already, two colleges have announced that they will not be playing football this fall football --- Morehouse College and Bowdoin College.
So, basically, the only way we see a college football season even close to normal is a dramatic fall in coronavirus cases. The widespread wearing of masks would go a long way to facilitating that.